Understanding Social Security Benefits

Over 64 million people today receive some form of Social Security benefits. (Source: Fast Facts & Figures About Social Security, 2015) But Social Security is more than just a retirement program. Its scope has expanded to include other benefits as well, such as disability, family, and survivor’s benefits.

      

Disability Benefits. If you become disabled, you may be eligible for Social Security disability benefits. The Social Security Administration (SSA) defines disability as a physical or mental condition severe enough to prevent a person from performing substantial work of any kind for at least a year. This is a strict definition of disability, so if you’re only temporarily disabled, don’t expect to receive Social Security disability benefits–benefits won’t begin until the sixth full month after the onset of your disability. And because processing your claim may take some time, apply for disability benefits as soon as you realize that your disability will be long term.

Family Benefits. If you begin receiving retirement or disability benefits, your family members might also be eligible to receive benefits based on your earnings record. Eligible family members may include:

  • Your spouse age 62 or older, if married at least 1 year
  • Your former spouse age 62 or older, if you were married at least 10 years
  • Your spouse or former spouse at any age, if caring for your child who is under age 16 or disabled
  • Your children under age 18, if unmarried
  • Your children under age 19, if full-time students (through grade 12) or disabled
  • Your children older than 18, if severely disabled

Each family member may receive a benefit that is as much as 50 percent of your benefit. However, the amount that can be paid each month to a family is limited. The total benefit that your family can receive based on your earnings record is about 150 to 180 percent of your full retirement benefit amount. If the total family benefit exceeds this limit, each family member’s benefit will be reduced proportionately. Your benefit won’t be affected.

Survivor’s Benefits. When you die, your family members may qualify for survivor’s benefits based on your earnings record. These family members include:

  • Your widow(er) or ex-spouse age 60 or older (or age 50 or older if disabled)
  • Your widow(er) or ex-spouse at any age, if caring for your child who is under 16 or disabled
  • Your children under 18, if unmarried
  • Your children under age 19, if full-time students (through grade 12) or disabled
  • Your children older than 18, if severely disabled
  • Your parents, if they depended on you for at least half of their support
  • Your widow(er) or children may also receive a one-time $255 death benefit immediately after you die.

Applying for Social Security Benefits. The SSA recommends apply for benefits online at the SSA website, but you can also apply by calling (800) 772-1213 or by making an appointment at your local SSA office. The SSA suggests that you apply for benefits three months before you want your benefits to start. If you’re applying for disability or survivor’s benefits, apply as soon as you are eligible. Depending on the type of Social Security benefits that you are applying for, you will be asked to furnish certain records, such as a birth certificate, W-2 forms, and verification of your Social Security number and citizenship. The documents must be original or certified copies. If any of your family members are applying for benefits, they will be expected to submit similar documentation. The SSA representative will let you know which documents you need and help you get any documents you don’t already have.

 

Larry Andersonvision fin. group

Vision Financial Group
4505 Pine Tree Circle, Birmingham, 35243
205-970-4909, www.vision-financialgroup.com

 

 

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